Research Programmes

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Conflict, Communication and Improving Close Relationships. Many of our studies examine how couples and families try to resolve relationship conflict, the effectiveness of different conflict strategies, and how managing conflict shapes relationships over time. [Read More Here]

Attachment Processes and Dyadic Regulation of Insecurity. Our research investigates how attachment insecurities can lead to emotion regulation difficulties and destructive behaviour in close relationships, but also explores the ways in which partners can help overcome these damaging effects. [Read More Here]

Enhancing the Provision and Receipt of Support in Close Relationships. We all need support at times but giving effective support can be very difficult to do. Our research focuses on identifying when, why and for who support can be helpful and harmful. [Read More Here]

Bias and Accuracy in Interpersonal Perceptions. We don’t always see the world the way it actually is, and we often don’t see our relationships the way our partners or family members do. Our research explores the predictors and consequences of biased perceptions, including how biased perceptions maintain depression and trigger aggressive behaviour.  [Read More Here]

Sexist Attitudes and Close Relationships. The beliefs that we have about men and women shape who we want to have relationships with, how we try to resolve conflict and support our partners, and how we respond when our relationships don’t live up to expectations. Our research examines the impact sexist attitudes can have on close relationships as well as how these processes influence gender inequality. [Read More Here]

Emotion Regulation and Family Dynamics. Emotion regulation involves trying to change or alter our emotional experiences, such as thinking about events in a different way or withdrawing from others in order to reduce the intensity of negative emotions. We investigate how relationship processes shape emotional regulation as well as the personal and interpersonal consequences of different emotion regulation strategies. [Read More Here]

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